GSN Games Acquires Gamedonia

Today, GSN Games is proud to announce the latest addition to our growing global organization with the acquisition of Gamedonia – a mobile games backend-as-a-service developer based in Barcelona, Spain. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. This acquisition of both Gamedonia’s platform and team will help GSN Games power rapid game development across studios. Gamedonia’s talented team of eight technologists have already begun integrating with GSN Games. The team is working closely with our GSN Games India studio to implement its leading backend technology into India’s game development pipeline. Gamedonia, which will become GSN Games Barcelona, will work closely with the technology leadership team of GSN Games India. Welcoming the Gamedonia team, Chief Operating Officer, Steve Brunell said, “GSN Games’ acquisition of Gamedonia aligns with our strategy of leveraging talented teams and advanced technologies to create best-in-class games that delight millions of players worldwide. We are pleased to welcome the Gamedonia team, and already are on our way to integrating their expertise in order to power rapid game development across the GSN Games organization.” David Xicota, CEO and Founder of Gamedonia commented, “We are excited to join GSN Games, one of the world’s leading developers and publishers of mobile games. The Gamedonia team brings both leading technologists and a high-performing mobile backend platform with the services and tools required to accelerate game development. While this is an exciting change for the team at Gamedonia, we want to reassure all of our existing customers that the Gamedonia platform they have come to rely on for backend and real-time game development will remain the same for the foreseeable future....

How to Design the Data Structure for a Turn Based Game

One of the recurring questions you ask our support team is how to actually make a turn based game in Gamedonia. Because you’re already great coding features for your games, all you may need is a little guidance on how to organize your design to make the things you want work. When you see the following example, you’ll see how easy it is.   Stuff needed to build a turn-based game To keep things simple, let’s say you want to build a classic tic-tac-toe game with Gamedonia. What features should you expect from a game like this? Multiple simultaneous games. Players should be able to have multiple games with different opponents taking place at the same time. Different game status. Every game should have a status that indicates what to expect. Waiting, created, running, finished or cancelled. Play with listed friends. You could have the option to challenge your friends to a game or add new friends to the list. Play with random users. You may want to play with people you don’t know. Play same skill users. You might want to play against random players that have a similar skill than you do. Making a game with Gamedonia that has all these features is easy. All you need to know is how to lay out the features to make them work like you want. Here are a few questions you should be able to answer.   #1 How are you going to store data? In Gamedonia, game data is stored in collections, which is like a table in an SQL database. There are some differences though. In a collection you...

Game Development Quotes [Cool & Inspiring]

The video game industry has many outspoken people to learn a lot from, especially if you have little mileage as a developer. I’ve put up a list of thought provoking game development quotes by influencers of the video game community. I hope you enjoy them! Game development quotes to learn from A lot of indie developers who became ‘overnight successes’ were working at it for ten years. Click To Tweet Source: gamesindustry   A great way to not make money is to make something you don’t believe in. Make your game. Be confident. Click To Tweet Source: gamesindustry   Nobody in this industry knows what they’re doing – we just have a gut assumption based on the games that we can play. Click To Tweet Source: develop-online   Price is only an issue in the absence of value. Click To Tweet Source: blackshellmedia   You can make an amazing game but you can’t make a success. Your players make the success. Click To Tweet Source: pocketgamer   Golden rule of level design—Finish your First level last. Click To Tweet Source: doublefinetv   What people will still pay for is how content makes them feel. They pay for progress. They pay to stand out. To fit in. To give. To win. Click To Tweet Source: gamasutra   Playing asynchronous games allows me to play when it’s convenient. […] whenever I want, including when I’m sitting on the porcelain throne. Click To Tweet Source: subterfugeblog   They want to tell stories that will touch people’s hearts. It should be the experience, that is touching. What I strive for is to make the...

How to get your game featured in the App Store

Apple recently launched a new Twitter account that’s completely dedicated to games! Yay! This is great for gamers, but, what about game developers? Well, one of the first things @AppStoreGames did was to shed some light on how you could have games featured in the App Store. They shared five areas where your game could stand out to get the attention of the Apple curation crew. These aren’t ground breaking, but they give you a better idea what their thought process is when they feature games in the App Store. These are 5 things that impact your chances at ‘featureship’. Why are games featured in the App Store Sometimes the simplest games can be the most profound. Take Leo’s Fortune, for example. http://t.co/i7xiv5zHq6 pic.twitter.com/cheSW5s8UC — App Store Games (@AppStoreGames) september 3, 2015 As DEVICE 6 taught us, the most stirring tales don’t always come from books and movies. http://t.co/9pJ38S0M5m pic.twitter.com/XCSH4aRtTE — App Store Games (@AppStoreGames) september 3, 2015  We love discovering music in games. Sword & Sworcery’s soundtrack is sublime. http://t.co/Q0wTWPzOND pic.twitter.com/LRyHgmzQIE — App Store Games (@AppStoreGames) september 3, 2015 The coolest art we’ve ever seen is in our favorite games. Just look at Monument Valley. http://t.co/I4OF5bysiN pic.twitter.com/2Gyr9jbXuB — App Store Games (@AppStoreGames) september 3, 2015 We love finding new ways to experience playing games, and that’s why we love Heads Up! http://t.co/crYGu7TixA pic.twitter.com/lCJoGjfzbf — App Store Games (@AppStoreGames) september 3, 2015   5 reasons why games are featured in the App Store Click To Tweet Because only a few games get featured, it’s really ahrd to hit the jackpot in the App Store. That’s why most developers rely on app...

5 Ways to calculate lifetime value for free-to-play games

Vasiliy Sabirov from devtodev shares with us an insightful article where you’ll learn the best way to calculate the lifetime value for your game or app. The question of calculating lifetime value (LTV), also known as customer lifetime value (CLV), sooner or later pops up before the developers of mobile games and apps. There are many valid methods to calculate LTV. In this article, we will describe the 5 most common methods and will identify their strengths and weaknesses. These methods are especially suitable for the free-to-play model. We’ll start with the most simple (and rough) way to calculate lifetime value for free-to-play games. Don’t worry, following methods will get more and more accurate to predict the LTV of your apps.   Lifetime value for free-to-play games: transitioning from quick to accurate Method #1: Post Factum This method stands out from all the ones that will follow because it does not model LTV, meaning it doesn’t predict LTV, but considers actual LTV. For this method, it is necessary to take a cohort of people who have already left the game or app, to see how much money the whole cohort brought in and then divide that amount by the size of the cohort. It is desirable that users were registered during the same period of time. For example during the same month, or better still, the same day. In practice, this method is poorly applicable because there is always at least one person in the cohort who is still active, no matter how long the cohort was registered. And this is why in practice the LTV is modeled and not calculated as the...

Realtime server commands for multiplayer games

When making a multiplayer game, one of the most important issues to cover is how your networking communications will be addressed by your game design. The game characters are constantly moving and you should be able to position them and transmit their location accurately to all the players. But, what type of information should you send to communicate between players if you’re making a real time multiplayer game? You’ve got several options to start off: The position of every character, the exact position at any given moment Start and end position of every character, and have the client interpolate the position The user inputs that makes a character interact with the game, aka commands Let’s break down the characteristics of these options and the problems they pose.   #1 The position of every character This is the most simple approach when trying to communicate with multiple players. The fundamental issue with this approach are the amount of messages that need to be broadcasted, even for simple games. Let’s say that you want to make a 3D game that allows three players to play simultaneously and that you want it to run on 30 frames per second. That makes 90 msg/sec. If every character position has 4 variables: x,y,z for position, and α for rotation, you’ll have to process 360 variables/sec. players fps msg/sec variables variables/sec 3 30 90 x,y,z,α 360 Let’s see how much time you have to process every frame of your game. 1.000 milliseconds / 30 fps = 33,33 ms/frame In those 33ms not only should you compute the position of the players, but also cram in graphics...